Dog News
  • iconCare for cats? So did people along the Silk Road more than 1,000 years ago
    Common domestic cats, as we know them today, might have accompanied Kazakh pastoralists as pets more than 1,000 years ago. This is indicated by new analyses done on an almost complete cat skeleton found during an excavation along the former Silk Road in southern Kazakhstan. An international research team has reconstructed the cat's life, revealing astonishing insights into the relationship between humans and pets at the time.
  • iconOwner behavior affects effort and accuracy in dogs' communications
    Researchers have found that dogs adapt their communicative strategies to their environment and that owner behavior influences communicative effort and success. Experimental results found no evidence that dogs rely on communication history or follow the principle of least effort and suggest that owner behavior has a bigger impact on canine communication than previously thought.
  • iconThe sixth sense of animals: An early warning system for earthquakes?
    Continuously observing animals with motion sensors could improve earthquake prediction.
  • iconGrassroots dog vaccinations can help stop rabies, but not alone
    While scientists are trying to find a vaccine for COVID-19, the rabies virus continues to kill 59,000 people every year. But unlike COVID, a vaccine has existed for more than a century. Vaccinating dogs can stop the spread to humans, but systemic challenges make that easier said that done. In a new study, scientists where grassroots campaigns to stop rabies work -- and where they need to be coupled with large-scale efforts.
  • iconHow old is your dog in human years? New method better than 'multiply by 7'
    How old is your tail-wagging bundle of joy in human years? According to the well-known ''rule of paw,'' one dog year is the equivalent of 7 years. Now scientists say it's wrong. Dogs are much older than we think, and researchers devised a more accurate formula to calculate a dog's age based on the chemical changes in the DNA as organisms grow old.
  • iconSled dogs are closely related to 9,500-year-old 'ancient dog'
    Sled dogs are much older and have adapted to Arctic conditions much earlier than previously thought. Researchers show that ancestors of modern sled dogs have worked and lived with humans for over 9,500 years.
  • iconDangerous tick-borne bacterium extremely rare in New Jersey
    There's some good news in New Jersey about a potentially deadly tick-borne bacterium. Researchers examined more than 3,000 ticks in the Garden State and found only one carrying Rickettsia rickettsii, the bacterium that causes Rocky Mountain spotted fever. But cases of tick-borne spotted fevers have increased east of the Mississippi River, and more research is needed to understand why.
  • icon'Cooperative' and 'independent' dog breeds may not react differently to unfair outcomes
    Cooperative-worker dog breeds do not appear to respond more negatively to unfair outcomes than do independent-worker breeds, according to a new study. Although the sample size was small, the results do not support the hypothesis that inequity aversion and cooperation co-evolved.
  • iconDigitize your dog into a computer game
    Researchers have developed motion capture technology that enables you to digitize your dog without a motion capture suit and using only one camera.
  • iconMonitoring environmental exposures in dogs could be early warning system for human health
    Man's best friend may also be man's best bet for figuring out how environmental chemicals could impact our health.
  • iconYes, your dog wants to rescue you
    Imagine you're a dog. Your owner is trapped in a box and is crying out for help. Are you aware of his despair? If so, can you set him free? And what's more, do you really want to? That's what researchers wanted to know when they gave dogs the chance to rescue their owners.
  • iconFearful Great Danes provide new insights to genetic causes of fear
    Researchers have identified a new genomic region and anxiety-related candidate genes associated with fearfulness in dogs. Findings support their hypothesis that fearfulness and anxiety are hereditary traits in dogs, and there may be shared factors underlying anxiety in both humans and dogs.
  • iconCBD improves arthritis symptoms in dogs
    This study shows that in dogs diagnosed with arthritis, CBD treatment significantly improved quality of life as documented by both owner and veterinarian assessments.
  • iconReintroduction of wolves tied to return of tall willows in Yellowstone National Park
    The reintroduction of wolves into Yellowstone National Park is tied to the recovery of tall willows in the park, according to a new study.
  • iconWhy cats have more lives than dogs when it comes to snakebite
    Cats are twice as likely to survive a venomous snakebite than dogs, and the reasons behind this strange phenomenon have just been revealed. The research team compared the effects of snake venoms on the blood clotting agents in dogs and cats, hoping to help save the lives of our furry friends.
  • iconSaving livestock by thinking like a predator
    Humans have struggled to reduce the loss of livestock to carnivores for thousands of years, and yet, solutions remain elusive. According to a new study, solving this ancient puzzle requires going back to Ecology 101. Simply put, getting in the mind of predators -- considering how they hunt, how their prey behaves and the landscape -- will help wildlife managers discourage wild carnivores from preying on valuable livestock.
  • iconDogs can detect traces of gasoline down to one billionth of a teaspoon
    Trained dogs can detect fire accelerants such as gasoline in quantities as small as one billionth of a teaspoon, according to new research by chemists. The study provides the lowest estimate of the limit of sensitivity of dogs' noses and has implications for arson investigations.
  • iconThe movie 'Jurassic Park' got it wrong: Raptors don't hunt in packs
    A new analysis of raptor teeth shows that raptorial dinosaurs likely did not hunt in big, coordinated packs like dogs. Though widely accepted, evidence for this behavior is relatively weak. Recently, scientists have proposed a different model for behavior in raptors that is thought to be more like Komodo dragons, in which individuals may attack the same animal but cooperation is limited.
  • iconStress in parents of children with autism: Pets may help
    While current events have increased stress for all families, parents of children with autism report higher levels of stress on average than parents of typically developing kids. Feeling overwhelmed and overburdened by various responsibilities, some parents turn to pets as a source of comfort and support.
  • iconThe origin of feces: coproID reliably predicts sources of ancient scat
    The archaeological record is littered with feces, a potential goldmine for insights into ancient health and diet, parasite evolution, and the ecology and evolution of the microbiome. The main problem for researchers is determining whose feces is under examination.
  • iconQuestionnaire survey identifies potential separation-related problems in cats
    The first questionnaire survey to identify possible separation-related problems in cats found 13.5 percent of all sampled cats displayed potential issues during their owner's absence, according to a new study.
  • iconTherapy dogs may help lower emergency clinicians' stress
    New research indicates that for physicians and nurses working evening shifts in the emergency department, interacting with a therapy dog for several minutes may help lower stress.
  • iconFirst complete German shepherd DNA offers new tool to fight disease
    The DNA sequencing of a healthy German shepherd offers scientists new insight into the evolution of the domestic dog while also enabling dogs to be screened for hip and other diseases much more accurately.
  • iconUrban dogs are more fearful than their cousins from the country
    Inadequate socialization, inactivity and an urban living environment are associated with social fearfulness in dogs. Among the most fearful breeds were the Shetland Sheepdog and the Spanish Water Dog, while Wheaten Terriers were one of the most fearless breeds.
  • iconHow animals understand numbers influences their chance of survival
    While they can't pick out precise numbers, animals can comprehend that more is, well, more. A neurobiologist explored the current literature on how different animal species comprehend numbers and the impact on their survival, arguing that we won't fully understand the influence of numerical competence unless we study it directly.
  • iconA gene defect associated with a severe canine lung disease identified
    A severe hereditary lung disease has been described in Finnish Airedale Terriers with a failure to thrive during the first days of lives. Researchers discovered the underlying gene defect in the LAMP3 gene, which may also be associated with the lung problems of certain newborn babies.
  • iconNew research unpicks root causes of separation anxiety in dogs
    Separation anxiety in dogs should be seen as a symptom of underlying frustrations rather than a diagnosis, and understanding these root causes could be key to effective treatment, new research by animal behavior specialists suggests.
  • iconUnwanted behavior in dogs is common, with great variance between breeds
    All dog breeds have unwanted behavior, such as noise sensitivity, aggressiveness and separation anxiety, but differences in frequency between breeds are great. Various unwanted behavior traits often occur simultaneously.
  • iconVeterinarians: Dogs, too, can experience hearing loss
    Just like humans, dogs are sometimes born with impaired hearing or experience hearing loss as a result of disease, inflammation, aging or exposure to noise. Dog owners and K-9 handlers ought to keep this in mind when adopting or caring for dogs, and when bringing them into noisy environments.
  • iconCat food mystery foils diet study
    How a study aimed at assessing the wildlife impacts of domestic cats was foiled by the mysterious ingredients of cat food.
  • iconFur-friendly 'wearable for pets' and their humans
    Researchers have invented a new health tracking sensor for pets and people that monitors vital signs through fur or clothing.
  • iconHimalayan wolf discovered to be a unique wolf adapted to harsh high altitude life
    Researchers have discovered that the Himalayan wolf is a unique wolf characteristically adapted to the harsh life in the Asian high altitudes where low oxygen levels challenge all life forms.
  • iconDog domestication during ice age
    Analysis of Paleolithic-era teeth from a 28,500-year-old fossil site in the Czech Republic provides supporting evidence for two groups of canids -- one dog-like and the other wolf-like - with differing diets, which is consistent with the early domestication of dogs.
  • iconFecal excretion of PFAS by pets
    Per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) are used in a wide range of consumer products, from pizza boxes to carpets to non-stick cookware. Therefore, it's not surprising that these water- and stain-repelling substances are ubiquitous in the environment. Now, researchers report that cats and dogs excrete some PFAS in their feces at levels that suggest exposures above the minimum risk level, which could also have implications for the pets' owners.
  • iconA roadblock for disease-causing parasites
    Thread-like parasitic worms cause millions of cases of canine heartworm each year, and more than 100 million cases of lymphatic filariasis, also known as elephantiasis, in humans. New research shows that ramping up the immune response of mosquitoes blocked their ability to transmit these harmful parasites.
  • iconAntibiotic-resistance in Tanzania is an environmental problem
    WSU study finds that environmental transmission rather than antibiotic use explains the presence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria in people, domestic animals and wildlife.
  • iconIdentifying factors associated with reports of accidental opioid poisoning in dogs
    Dogs that are smaller, younger, non-neutered, or live in US counties with high opioid prescription rates are at higher risk of being the subjects of phone calls about accidental opioid poisoning to a poison control center.
  • iconNew dog, old tricks? Stray dogs can understand human cues
    Pet dogs are highly receptive to commands from their owners. But is this due to their training or do dogs have an innate ability to understand human signals? A new study finds that 80% of untrained stray dogs successfully followed pointing directions from people to a specific location. The results suggest that dogs can understand and respond to complex gestures without any training, meaning that dogs may have an innate connection to human behaviors.
  • iconScientists unexpectedly witness wolf puppies play fetch
    When it comes to playing a game of fetch, many dogs are naturals. But now, researchers report that the remarkable ability to interpret human social communicative cues that enables a dog to go for a ball and then bring it back also exists in wolves.
  • iconNewly discovered genetic element adjusts coat color in dogs
    Why are Irish Setters so red while other breeds can come in different hues? Geneticists now have an answer for why some dogs have more intense coat colors than others.
  • iconPreventing adverse drug reactions in dogs
    If not identified before surgery, a rare genetic mutation could result in your dog being exposed to dangerously high levels of anesthetic agents.
  • iconJaguars could prevent a not-so-great American biotic exchange
    In eastern Panama, canid species from North and South America are occurring together for the first time. Urban and agricultural development and deforestation along the Mesoamerican Biological Corridor might be generating a new passageway for these invasive species adapted to human disturbance.
  • iconDogs and wolves are both good at cooperating
    A team of researchers have found that dogs and wolves are equally good at cooperating with partners to obtain a reward. When tested in same-species pairs, dogs and wolves proved equally successful and efficient at solving a given problem. This finding suggests that basic cooperation abilities were present in a common ancestor of dogs and wolves, and have not been lost in the domestication process.
  • iconEarly-life exposure to dogs may lessen risk of developing schizophrenia
    Ever since humans domesticated the dog, the faithful, obedient and protective animal has provided its owner with companionship and emotional well-being. Now, a study suggests that being around 'man's best friend' from an early age may have a health benefit as well -- lessening the chance of developing schizophrenia as an adult.
  • iconDogs process numerical quantities in similar brain region as humans
    The results of a new canine numerosity study suggests that a common neural mechanism has been deeply conserved across mammalian evolution.
  • iconAnimal-assisted interventions positive for people's health
    The impact of animal-assisted interventions for both patients and health services could be substantial, but more rigorous research is needed.
  • iconDogs promote page turning for young readers
    Reading in the presence of a pooch may be the page-turning motivation young children need, suggests a researcher. A new study examines the behavior of 17 children from Grades 1 to 3 while reading with and without a dog.
  • iconUnique sled dogs helped the inuit thrive in the North American Arctic
    The legacy of these Inuit dogs survives today in Arctic sled dogs, making them one of the last remaining descendant populations of indigenous, pre-European dog lineages in the Americas.
  • iconDinosaur skull turns paleontology assumptions on their head
    A team of researchers has unearthed a well-preserved Styracosaurus skull -- and its facial imperfections have implications for how paleontologists identify new species of dinosaurs. Nicknamed Hannah, the dinosaur was a Styracosaurus -- a horned dinosaur over five meters in length with a fan of long horns. Paleontologists have learned much from those horns -- because they aren't symmetrical.
  • iconSimple model explains why different four-legged animals adopt similar gaits
    Most mammals walk at slow speeds and run or trot at intermediate speeds because these movement strategies are energetically optimal, according to a new study.
  • iconDog and sheep bones help injured pigeons fly again
    Sheep and dog bones can be whittled into orthopedic pins that stabilize pigeons' fractured wings, helping the fractures to heal properly without follow-up surgery. Researchers describe the treatment, which is cheaper and more efficient than using metal pins for pigeon rehabilitative surgeries.
  • iconWatch out for 'feather duvet lung' caution doctors
    Watch out for 'feather duvet lung' doctors have warned after treating a middle aged man with severe lung inflammation that developed soon after he bought feather-filled bedding.
  • iconHumans' ability to read dogs' facial expressions is learned, not innate
    Researchers assessed how experience with dogs affects humans' ability to recognize dog emotions. Participants who grew up in a cultural context with a dog-friendly attitude were more proficient at recognizing dog emotions. This suggests that the ability to recognize dogs' expressions is learned through age and experience and is not an evolutionary adaptation.
  • iconAI could help diagnose dogs suffering from chronic pain and Chiari-like malformation
    A new artificial intelligence (AI) technique could eventually help veterinarians quickly identify Cavalier King Charles Spaniel (CKCS) dogs with a chronic disease that causes crippling pain. The same technique identified unique biomarkers which inspired further research into the facial changes in dogs affected by Chiari-like malformation (CM).
  • iconLiver-chip identifies drug toxicities in human, rat, and dog models
    Liver toxicity is a big problem in the drug, food, and consumer products industries, especially because results in animal models fail to predict how chemicals will affect humans. A new Liver-Chip successfully predicts how different drugs impact rat, dog, and human models, and could help get the most effective drugs to patients faster.
  • iconNew findings on gut microbiome's interactions with GI diseases
    A study offers new insight on how the gut bacteria of dogs interact with a healthy vs. unhealthy GI tract, which could contribute to the development of new therapies for GI diseases in both dogs and humans.