Cat News
  • iconNew species of extinct marsupial lion discovered in Australia
    A team of Australian scientists has discovered a new species of marsupial lion which has been extinct for at least 19 million years. The findings are based on fossilized remains of the animal's skull, teeth, and humerus (upper arm bone) found in the Riversleigh World Heritage Area of remote northwestern Queensland.
  • iconToxoplasmosis: How a cat parasite exploits immune cells to reach the brain
    Scientists have previously shown that a parasite from cats can infect people's brain and affect our behaviour. Now, researchers at Stockholm University have discovered how the parasite takes control of our cells.
  • iconEndangered listing urged for cheetahs
    Researchers present evidence that low cheetah population estimates in southern Africa support a call to list the cheetah as "Endangered" on the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) Red List.
  • iconVeterinary surgeons perform first-known brain surgery to treat hydrocephalus in fur seal
    A neurosurgical team has successfully performed what is believed to be a first-of-its-kind brain surgery on a Northern fur seal named Ziggy Star in an attempt to address her worsening neurologic condition. Ziggy, an adult female, is recovering well at her permanent home at Mystic Aquarium in Mystic, Conn.
  • iconImpact of lions living alongside giraffe populations
    New research is calling for an urgent review into how populations of giraffes are managed in the wild when living alongside lions.
  • iconExperts raise concerns over raw meat diets for cats and dogs
    Experts are warning dog and cat owners to be aware of the risks associated with feeding their pets raw meat-based diets, instead of the more conventional dry or canned pet foods.
  • iconHabitat fragmentation a bigger threat to Chile’s güiña wildcat than persecution by humans
    Research by conservationists has found that habitat fragmentation, and the subdivision of large farms into smaller ones, are the biggest threats facing the güiña wildcat in Chile.
  • iconCanine distemper confirmed in Far Eastern leopard, world's most endangered big cat
    The Far Eastern or Amur leopard (Panthera pardus orientalis) is already among the rarest of the world's big cats, but new research reveals that it faces yet another threat: infection with canine distemper virus (CDV).
  • iconFemale cats are more likely to be right-handed, researchers discover
    Researchers have found that female cats are much more likely to use their right paw than males.
  • iconFat cat? Here's how much to feed to lose weight
    Does your cat lay around all day, only getting up to eat and visit the litter box? Chances are, he's overweight. Maybe you've switched to the 'diet' cat food or tried feeding him less, but you might have noticed it's not easy to get that weight off. A new study explains what it takes to get kitty to slim down.
  • iconPredator control can have unintended consequences
    Introduced predators pose threats to biodiversity and are implicated in the extinction of many native species.
  • iconMMV malaria box phenotyped against plasmodium and toxoplasma
    Scientists have completed phenotypic screening of a large collection of potent chemical inhibitors (known as MMV Malaria Box), against pathogenic parasites toxoplasma gondii and plasmodium falciparum, causative agents of human toxoplasmosis and malaria. This knowledge opens up new avenues to study unique stages of infectious cycle that are affected by inhibitor classes towards anti-parasitic drug development.
  • iconAn outdoor cat can damage your sustainability cred
    If you install solar panels on your roof and avoid dousing your lawn with chemicals and pesticides, your online peers may consider you to be environmentally friendly. But this street cred can all be erased if you let your cat roam around outdoors.
  • iconCheetahs' inner ear is one of a kind, vital to high-speed hunting
    The world's fastest land animal, the cheetah, is a successful hunter not only because it is quick, but also because it can hold an incredibly still gaze while pursuing prey. For the first time, researchers have investigated the cheetah's extraordinary sensory abilities by analyzing the speedy animal's inner ear, an organ that is essential for maintaining body balance and adapting head posture during movement in most vertebrates.
  • iconNovel research approach sheds light on how midsize predators interact
    A novel research approach has resulted in a key step toward better protecting the fisher, an important forest predator that findings show is the dominant small carnivore when present.
  • iconCambodia's last leopards on brink of extinction
    A new study has confirmed that the world's last breeding population of leopards in Cambodia is at immediate risk of extinction, having declined an astonishing 72% during a five-year period. The population represents the last remaining leopards in all of eastern Indochina - a region incorporating Cambodia, Laos and Vietnam.
  • iconHow cats and dogs are consuming and processing parabens
    Many households can claim at least one four-legged friend as part of the family. But pets that primarily stay indoors can have increased rates of diseases, such as diabetes, kidney diseases and hypothyroidism compared with those that stay exclusively outside. Some scientists propose that chemical substances in the home could contribute to these illnesses.
  • iconMesenchymal stem cell therapy: Holding promise for feline inflammatory diseases
    Stem cell therapy is acknowledged as having great potential for the treatment of a variety of diseases in both people and animals. The use of bone marrow-derived stem cells is well established in the treatment of human cancer patients, and veterinary applications for bone marrow- and adipose-derived stem cells are being evaluated.
  • iconHunger guides mountain lions' actions to enter residential areas
    In a new study, researchers found that while big cats like mountain lions are generally fearful of and avoid humans, hunger can dampen that fear.
  • iconFirst evidence of live-traded dogs for Maya ceremonies
    Earliest evidence that Mayas raised and traded dogs and other animals -- probably for ceremonies -- from Ceibal, Guatemala.
  • iconThe problem of jaguars and space in western Paraguay
    A recent study shows how researchers used GPS technology and new analytical techniques to produce the first rigorous estimates of jaguar spatial needs and movements in the Gran Chaco and Pantanal ecosystems of Paraguay.
  • iconAnimal nutrition: Excess phosphorus damages the kidney
    A new study carried out by veterinarians shows that high phosphorus intake, comparable to the average level provided by prepared cat food, can be deleterious to kidney function in healthy cats.
  • iconResearch suggests low density of snow leopards in Nepal`s Conservation Area
    The snow leopard is a mammal species of the cat family found at high altitudes in Nepal and other countries around the Himalayan range. However, it has been included in the vulnerable category of IUCN Red list of threatened species in recent years for various reasons.
  • iconJaguars and well-managed logging concessions can coexist, say conservationists
    Logging activities in biodiverse forests can have a huge negative impact on wildlife, particularly large species such as big cats, but a new study proves that the Western Hemisphere's largest cat species -- the jaguar (Panthera onca) -- can do well in logging concessions that are properly managed.
  • iconRats, cats, and people trade-off as main course for mosquitoes in Baltimore, Md.
    Understanding how neighborhood dynamics regulate mosquito bites is key to managing diseases like West Nile virus and Zika virus. Today in Parasites & Vectors, researchers report that in Baltimore, Md., socioeconomic differences between neighborhoods influence bite risk, with rats being a primary blood meal source in lower income neighborhoods.
  • iconHow cheetahs outsmart lions and hyenas
    Cheetahs in the Serengeti National Park adopt different strategies while eating to deal with threats from top predators such as lions or hyenas. A new study shows that male cheetahs and single females eat their prey as quickly as possible. Mothers with cubs, on the other hand, watch out for possible threats while their young are eating in order to give them enough time to eat their fill.
  • iconLeopard meals: Females go for diversity
    Leopards, top predators of the African savannah, are known to feed on a variety of prey species. It has been largely unknown, however, whether they specialize in certain prey animals and which factors might influence prey preferences. Scientists investigated these questions by studying the diet of leopards on commercial farmland in central Namibia.
  • iconNew virus identified in cat
    Researchers have found a previously undiscovered hepadnavirus in an immunocompromised cat, and subsequently in banked samples.
  • iconQuantum effects observed in photosynthesis
    Molecules that are involved in photosynthesis exhibit the same quantum effects as non-living matter, concludes an international team of scientists. This is the first time that quantum mechanical behavior was proven to exist in biological systems that are involved in photosynthesis. The interpretation of these quantum effects in photosynthesis may help in the development of nature-inspired light-harvesting devices.
  • iconSecret life of an enigmatic Antarctic apex predator
    Scientists have, for the first time, tracked the lives of leopard seals as they migrate around Antarctica. The team followed these formidable predators as they move from the frozen Antarctic sea-ice to the more northerly sub-Antarctic islands where they prey on penguins, seals and krill.
  • iconDogs prefer to eat fat, and cats surprisingly tend toward carbs
    Dogs gravitate toward high-fat food, but cats pounce on carbohydrates with even greater enthusiasm, according to research into the dietary habits of America's two most popular pets.
  • iconLion conservation research can be bolstered by input from a wide-range of professionals
    To tackle the sharp decline in lion numbers, conservation research should consider wild prey, livestock and the environment, not just human-lion interaction, a new review suggests.
  • iconMap of Javan leopard distribution provides guidance for conservation efforts
    The first robust estimate of the distribution of the Javan leopard offers reliable information on where conservation efforts must be prioritized to safeguard the Indonesian island's last remaining large carnivore.
  • iconTerritory holders and floaters: Two spatial tactics of male cheetahs
    Scientists have analyzed the spatial behavior of cheetahs. They showed that male cheetahs operate two space use tactics which are associated with different life-history stages.
  • iconA new twist on how parasites invade host cells
    Researchers have decoded the mechanisms used by the parasite Toxoplasma gondii to enter the cells of a host. Using high-resolution, high-speed imaging, they identified a unique process by which the parasite closes the 'entry door' it creates in order to enter and inhabit a host cell.
  • iconRanking locations for lion conservation in southern Africa -- a new approach
    An international team of scientists has developed a new strategy to rank locations for lion conservation activities, based on GPS collar data revealing lions' movements.
  • icon84 highly endangered amur leopards remain in China and Russia
    Scientists estimate there are only 84 remaining highly endangered Amur leopards (Panthera pardus orientalis) remaining in the wild across its current range along the southernmost border of Primorskii Province in Russia and Jilin Province of China.
  • iconWhole blood test for toxoplasmosis is sensitive, specific
    Transmission of toxoplasmosis from mother to fetus can lead to severe congenital problems and fetal death, and tests for the parasitic infection during pregnancy are critical. Now, researchers have showed the efficacy of a low-cost whole blood test for toxoplasmosis.
  • iconIt’s Cute, but This Cat Probably Wasn’t Feeding Its Toy Kittens
    Feline behaviorists offered explanations for a viral tweet that captured a cat’s tendency to bring stuffed toys to its food bowl.
  • iconAre vulnerable lions eating endangered zebras?
    Are Laikipia's recovering lions turning to endangered Grevy's zebras (Equus grevyi) for their next meal?
  • iconAs Animal-Assisted Therapy Thrives, Enter the Cats
    More research is done on the therapeutic benefits of dogs than on cats and other animals. But there are signs of change.
  • iconCommon pesticide inhibits brain development in frogs
    New research reveals that low doses of a commonly used pesticide potentially harm the Northern Leopard frog by inhibiting their brain development.
  • iconSniffing out error in detection dog data
    New research finds three alternative answers beyond errors in handler or dog training that can explain why dogs trained to identify scat for conservation purposes sometimes collect non-target scats.
  • iconThe Suburbs, Where Madness Meets Cat Murder
    There’s a killer stalking suburban London. Or is there?
  • iconChemicals linked to endocrine disorder in older pet cats
    New research suggests that there may be a link between higher levels of per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) in the environment and higher levels of hyperthyroidism in pet cats as they age.
  • iconCroydon Cat Killer: London Police Solve a Mystery
    Hundreds of dismembered bodies turned up, leading to fears that a sadist was at large. But officers say the cats were probably hit by cars, then scavenged by foxes.
  • iconParasite makes quick exit when researchers remove the handbrake
    Researchers have discovered a way to halt the invasion of the toxoplasmosis-causing parasite into cells, depriving the parasite of a key factor necessary for its growth. The findings are a key step in getting closer to a vaccine to protect pregnant women from the parasite Toxoplasma gondii, which carries a serious risk of miscarriage or birth defects.
  • iconInvasive snakes 'hitchhiking' on planes
    Scientists have discovered why brown tree snakes have become one of the most successful invasive species. The research team has been studying why a type of cat-eyed snake has been so effective at devastating native bird populations on the island of Guam.
  • iconIn the battle of cats vs. rats, the rats are winning
    New research finds that contrary to popular opinion, cats are not good predators of rats. The study -- the first to document interactions between feral cats and a wild rat colony -- shows that rats actively avoid cats, and only recorded two rat kills in 79 days. The findings add to growing evidence that any benefit of using cats to control city rats is outweighed by the threat they pose to birds and other urban wildlife.
  • iconHave asthma and a pet? Re-homing your cat or dog may not be necessary
    A study analyzed environmental exposures, like pet and secondhand smoke, to determine if they have a role in asthma control among children whose asthma is managed per NAEPP (EPR-3) guidelines. Researchers found that once asthma guidelines are followed, environmental exposures to pets or secondhand smoke were not significant factors in overall asthma improvement over time.
  • iconYour Dog May Be Smart, but She’s Not Exceptional
    In a new study, scientists say that dogs do not stand out compared to other animals when it comes to intelligence.
  • iconCats v. Rats? In New York, the Rats Win
    At a recycling plant in Brooklyn, fat, stealthy rats were more than a match for feral cats, scientists found.
  • iconPets Are Like Family. But as Health Costs Rise, Few Are Insured That Way.
    Medical treatments can run thousands of dollars, and more owners are choosing to pay for them. Drug makers and insurers have taken notice.
  • iconThe Trade War’s Latest Casualties: China’s Coddled Cats and Dogs
    Some Chinese pet owners don’t trust local food and will even taste it themselves before serving it. For them, the fight means fewer and pricier choices.
  • iconGlyphosate found in cat and dog food
    A new study finds that glyphosate, the active herbicidal ingredient in widely used weed killers like Roundup, was present at low levels in a variety of dog and cat foods the researchers purchased at stores. Before you go switching Fido or Fluffy's favorite brand, however, be aware that the amounts of the herbicide found correspond to levels currently considered safe for humans.
  • iconGenome-wide study confirms six tiger subspecies
    Fewer than 4,000 free-ranging tigers remain in the wild. Efforts to protect these remaining tigers have also been stymied by uncertainty about whether they represent six, five or only two subspecies. Now, researchers who've analyzed the complete genomes of 32 representative tiger specimens confirm that tigers indeed fall into six genetically distinct groups.
  • iconHow to feed a cat: Consensus statement to the veterinary community
    The American Association of Feline Practitioners (AAFP) today released the AAFP Consensus Statement, 'Feline Feeding Programs: Addressing Behavioral Needs to Improve Feline Health and Wellbeing' and accompanying client brochure to the veterinary community. The Consensus Statement, published in the Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery, explores the medical, social, and emotional problems that can result from the manner in which most cats are currently fed.
  • iconSaber-toothed cats with oral injuries ate softer foods
    Saber-toothed cats, the large felid predators that once roamed Southern California, may have eaten softer foods after suffering oral injuries, according to a new study. Microscopic damage patterns on teeth from fossilized cats show the injured predators transitioned to seeking softer prey, like flesh instead of bone, which healthy cats may have provided for them, according to the study.
  • iconHow to Clean the Most Common Cat Messes
    From fur balls to, ahem, stains, here’s some help.
  • icon‘Touch Not the Cat’
    The Scottish wildcat, the last native cat in the United Kingdom, is endangered; fewer than 100 purebred specimens remain in the wild.